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The Thorn Birds movie 1 | Ralph de Bricassart and Meggie Cleary

Quotes from film part 1

Mrs. Smith: Good day, Father de Bricassart. Happy Christmas to you. Ralph de Bricassart: The same to you, Mrs. Smith. Why is it the roses here on Drogheda are always the loveliest to be found? Mrs. Smith: Aren't they heavenly? But it's the heat that makes them bloom, so makes me wilt. Ralph de Bricassart: But nothing is given without a disadvantage in it. Mrs. Smith: True enough, Father, true enough. I'll lay things out for Mass. Ralph de Bricassart: Amen. Happy Christmas, Mrs. Carson. Mary Carson: How many times do I have to tell you my name is Mary? Ralph de Bricassart: And yet you never call me Ralph. Mary Carson: All right, Ralph. Happy Christmas. It's very kind of you to spend it with a lonely old woman. Hardly that. Ralph de Bricassart: On the contrary, it is very kind of you to invite a lonely priest and fellow Irishman. Mary Carson: That's right. This is your first Christmas in exile, isn't it? Ralph de Bricassart: Exile? It's my first year in Australia. Mary Carson: That's not what I mean, and you know it. Six months now, and I still haven't figured out why the Church banished you out here to the land of Never-Never. What sin did you commit? What priestly vow did you break? Poverty? Obedience? Perhaps chastity? Ralph de Bricassart: You're quite sure I have been banished? Mary Carson: Of course. Look at you. You're aristocratic, witty, ambitious despite that facade of humility. And God knows you have a subtle mind. You're the stuff cardinals are made of. And you would look magnificent in red. So you've said before, so you say each time I visit here. And you're going to say, "But my dear Mrs. Carson, I am a priest. "Surely I can do God's work here "as well as in the seats of ecclesiastical power." Sometimes, I think you know me better than I know myself. Mary Carson: I'm certain of that, too. All right, now. Ready. Go! Come on! Come on! You can do it. Ralph won! Good on you, Father Ralph. Bravo, Father. Well done, Father de Bricassart. How do you like him? He's beautiful. Good! He's yours. Happy Christmas. Thank you. I'll take pleasure in riding him whenever I'm here but I can't accept him as a gift. Why not? You accepted the car I gave you. Because it allows me to get around and see my parishioners more often. A fine distinction. You'll accept my gifts only if some holy use can be made of them. It wasn't poverty. I beg your pardon? The vow you broke that got you banished. It must have been chastity, yes? All right, my Christmas gift to you: I insulted a bishop. A matter of local church policy. You broke your vow of obedience. That was ambitious of you. There's some comfort in the fact that the Pope himself later came out in favor of my views in the matter. Has he, now? And he hasn't rescued you? My dear Mrs. Carson, priests are expendable, bishops aren't. And it's not so terrible a banishment. I have you to remind me of the existence of civilization and I have Drogheda. Yes. You would like that, wouldn't you? You'd like to have my Drogheda. Would I? Yes, you would. If you could charm me into leaving Drogheda to the Church His Holiness would have to rescue you, reward you maybe even give you that beautiful red cardinal's robe some day. A masterful plan. But my dear Mrs. Carson I'm a priest. Surely I can serve God as well here as in the seats of ecclesiastical power. And how you'd hate it. Still, I have to give Drogheda to someone someday, don't I? That's worth thinking about. Mrs. Smith, I must go. Please give my thanks to Mrs. Carson for a delightful day. That will be all, thank you. You're not leaving so soon. It's late and a long way back to the parish. I hope I didn't say anything this afternoon to upset you. I mean, all that talk about inheriting Drogheda. You didn't upset me in the least. Good. Have you thought about it? About what, Mrs. Carson? About charming me out of Drogheda because I didn't say I couldn't be charmed, did I? Mrs. Carson. What is it you want from me? Why only your spiritual guidance of course, Father. You see, I have a decision to make and you're the only one that can help me with it. I'll do what I can. It's about my brother. Your brother? I thought you once said you had no family left. I have a brother. I haven't seen him in years. He lives in New Zealand. We both left Ireland to make our fortunes but Paddy hasn't fared too well. He's an experienced man with the land, however and he has a house full of sons. I'm thinking of bringing him here and making him my head stockman. I wonder you didn't think of it sooner. I did. I've just been waiting, shall we say to see what might develop. It would be a comfort to know I would be helping Paddy to know I'm not all alone in this world not quite reduced to leaving all my pretty pennies to the Church. It's a most generous gift, Mary. No. Never a gift. No, whoever inherits Drogheda earns it. Thank you, Father. Good night, Mrs. Carson. Father, it's time you were off. All right, Annie. I'll be right there. It'll be nice for Mrs. Carson, having her brother's family. I must see you about the chalk supply. Chalk? Three boxes are missing. I'll look into it. In Father Wattey's time, Father we took a much closer account of such things. Hello, I'm Father de Bricassart. Sorry I'm late. You'd be Mary Carson's brother? That's right, Father. Paddy Cleary. This is my wife Fiona. Mrs. Cleary. I'll be taking you on to Drogheda. I know you've had a very difficult journey. You're very kind. These are my boys, Father. This is Bob. Hello, Bob. Jack, and Stuie here. Take off your hat, son. And Frank. And who are you? Meggie Cleary: I'm Meggie. Are we going to live here? Not exactly. I'll show you your house later, Meggie. Mary Carson: Meggie? Yes, this is Meggie. Mary, we have no words to thank you for your kindness in bringing us here. Mary Carson: When you're as old as I am, and as rich the vultures start to circle. You're my only flesh and blood, Paddy. I don't have any sons, and Michael's been dead for over 30 years. A long time to be alone. I wonder you've never married again. Mary Carson: Marry again? And give some man control over me and all I have? No, that's not what I call living. No. As long as I am alive, Drogheda is mine and only mine. It's well to remember that. Of course, Mary. Let's have Mass right away, and then I'm sure we'd all enjoy a nice, hot meal at your table. Sounds very nice indeed, Father. 125,000 sheep. 1,000 head of cattle and more fence than you can ride in a month. The round of work is endless but Drogheda is the biggest in all of New South Wales, and the best. I've seen to that. All I can say is, it looks like heaven to me. If your idea of heaven is hard work, you're right. But we Clearys know about hard work, don't we, sister? Not that it got us very far back in Ireland. I don't want you just to lead the men. I want you to work with them and to keep on working long after they've quit. When things go wrong, you take the blame. When they go right, don't expect any credit. And I'll give you a free hand with the land just as long as you keep Drogheda the biggest and the best.
   
But my dear Mrs. Carson, I am a priest
But my dear Mrs. Carson, I am a priest
 
Whoever inherits Drogheda, earns it!
Whoever inherits Drogheda, earns it!
 
Thorn Birds 1 Ralph de Bricassart and Meggie Cleary
Thorn Birds 1 Ralph de Bricassart and Meggie Cleary
 
Drogheda is mine and only mine
Drogheda is mine and only mine