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The Thorn Birds movie 11 | The Carson bequest to provide a link between the Australian church hierarchy and the Vatican

Quotes from film part 11

Vittorio Scarbanza di Contini-Verchese. Excellent. I'm very happy. So few outside the Vatican can pronounce my name. Will you take tea, Father? I confess I have adopted the custom. I believe you've been in Sydney for some time, Archbishop? Yes, as a papal legate it is my task to provide a link between the Australian church hierarchy and the Vatican. A rich country, Australia. She supports the Church well despite the Depression. One day the Holy Father will have to reward her by selecting an Australian cardinal. No doubt that will be many years away. Still, it is a very important part of my job to study likely men of your age. Oh, Sheba, must you be so selfish. You make my legs numb. De Bricassart I'm descended from Ranulf de Bricassart who came to England with William the Conqueror. Since Henry Vlll's time, the family has fallen into obscurity. In fact, I'm the last of the de Bricassarts. But you yourself appear to have found ways of dealing with obscurity. Your Grace? I refer to your penchant for attracting the notice of the Holy Father. The Carson bequest. Rather an achievement. Mrs. Carson was also faithful to the Church. Quite. Sheba, must you always dig in your claws when you're happy? How do you do that? A cat will never go to anyone, especially Sheba. Yet she goes to you as if you gave her caviar! So, you will administer the Carson estate. Given the current economic conditions I suppose we must expect some losses. No. I've just been over everything with the auditors and I think the investments will hold firm. I'm sure the Clearys will continue to manage Drogheda as if it were their own. You're fond of these Clearys. Yes, very. Do you love them all equally or do you love some more than others? I feel closest to the girl, Meggie. I've watched her grow up and I've always felt that she was my special responsibility. She's the only daughter and the parents sometimes tend to forget she exists. I see. Meggie! What on earth are you doing? Managing the stock horses. Are you now? And who decided that, may I ask? I did, since nobody else seemed to have plans for me. I see. I don't know if I can think of anything wrong with that. If you're going to manage stock horses I don't believe I'd use a thoroughbred to do it. He needs the exercise, Daddy. You wouldn't want Father Ralph to come back and find his horse fat and out of shape. Father Ralph? I don't think you'll be seeing him again. No, Drogheda's part of his past now. Meggie, you've kept your secret pretty well. I doubt if anyone else knows how you feel about Father Ralph. But it's no good for you to keep dreaming about him. You know he's a priest. He can stop being a priest, Stuie. And he will someday, Stuie. I just know he will. He can never stop being a priest. Why can't you understand that? The vows he took are sacred. They can't be broken, ever. And he never will break them, Meggie. Not even for you. You have been disobedient. Your promise of celibacy was neither made, nor broken lightly but it was broken. And, most unfortunately, that fact has now become public knowledge. We have no choice but to act. The Archbishop has left instructions for you to be sent to Darwin in the Northern Territory. There's a small frontier parish there. You'll be leaving immediately. Father John is waiting now to accompany you on your journey. And, of course, the young woman must never know where you've gone. Yes, Father. Goodbye. Father I think I know something of the pain you're feeling. You know, many in your situation might have given up the Church. But you have chosen to remain. That takes a great deal of courage. May God bless you for it. Such incidents are regrettable, my dear Ralph but I'm afraid even we priests are weak, and all too human. Still, one has to pity him. And Gillanbone is a paradise in comparison to the place he's being sent. Yes, Your Grace. Now, what on earth can this be? Happy Christmas, Fee. They're beautiful, simply beautiful. They may not be "the" finest in all of Australia but they're the real thing, all right. There we go. They are lovely. I must say, it's a nice surprise to find you all so brave and cheerful in spite of everything. Isn't it, Angus? Indeed, it is. Paddy, I want you to know I look on you as friends. And if there's ever anything I can do for you I hope you'll let me. Thank you, Angus. We're just pleased that you could be with us today. We should've got around to pay some calls before this but it's been a busy time, as you can imagine. I suppose it's as dry out your way as it is here, Mr. MacQueen. Terrible. I've never seen such mobs of kangas in so close. They were practically at the house, trying to get at the water. And you said you saw several grassfires on the way up from Melbourne didn't you, Aunt Sarah? Yes. I hate to start in slaughtering but the sheep are starving so bad already I'm afraid the wool will be too weak to bring any kind of price. Pete tells a good one on Aunty Mary. She was in Sydney once in a drought, and Pete sends a wire: "Half the sheep are starved. Please advise." And Aunty Mary sends a wire right back: "Shoot the rest." That's all you care about, isn't it, the profit? The price of the wool. Never mind that the poor sheep are suffering unspeakably. Well, ma'am out here, it's got to be the wool a man cares about, isn't it? It's not as if the sheep were people, you know. Quite right. I've seen city people dote on animals and yet, completely ignore a cry of help from a human being. Perhaps it's natural to have contempt for whatever there's too many of. How dare you? How dare you, when we come here in friendship? Sarah! No! You lecture me on the value of human life when your own son sits in the Melbourne prison for murder? Damn, Sarah! Paddy, I'm so sorry. I thought you knew. It was months ago. My son? Frank? He was in a fight in a pub there, in Melbourne. The other fellow died later. They called it murder because Frank is a professional boxer. They gave him a life sentence. Oh, my God. Oh, God. Fee. My Frank Fee, dear, pack your things, we'll go to him. No. I can't. It would kill him to see me. I'm going to Frank. Stuie is taking me. But you mustn't. Your mom doesn't want you to. If we could only take back the things we say and do. Daddy, I know about Frank. I came to understand it a long time ago. And you're not to blame for anything. I tried so hard to treat him like one of my own. But he was a thorn in my side from the first. He always stood between us. Always. And he will now until the day I die. I know she can't help the way she loves him no more than I can help my love for her. But we are to blame. We've let it take our hearts away from our own children. Meggie, I think I think of how much we've both held back from you. From you, most of all. It's all right, Daddy. Meggie No, don't.
   
Thorn Birds 11 The Carson bequest
Thorn Birds 11 The Carson bequest
 
I don't think you'll be seeing him again
I don't think you'll be seeing him again
 
The best of us find strength in such adversity
The best of us find strength in such adversity
 
You lecture me on the value of human life
You lecture me on the value of human life