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Watch Some Like It Hot (1959) free online

a super hot comedy directed and produced by Billy Wilder, starring Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis, and Jack Lemmon, about two broke, terrified, and desperate instrumentalists who, to hide from Chicago gangsters, run to Florida with a female band disguised as women. The film's title derives from the dialogue that takes place on Miami's beach between Sugar and Joe: "Does that mean you play that very fast music jazz?" "Yeah. Real hot." "I guess some like it hot. I personally prefer classical music." Liked #1 by AFI's 2000 list as 100 Funniest Movies. Watch online for free Some Like It Hot.

Main cast with pictures

Marilyn Monroe as Sugar Cane Kowalczyk
Marilyn Monroe as Sugar Cane Kowalczyk
a not very bright beautiful 24 years old woman, ukulele player and singer.
Tony Curtis as Joe Josephine Shell Oil Junior
Tony Curtis as Joe Josephine Shell Oil Junior
a handsome tenor saxophone player, a naive dog racing gambler.
Jack Lemmon as Jerry Daphne
Jack Lemmon as Jerry Daphne
a double bass player, more realistic but less fortunate than his friend.
Joe E. Brown as Osgood Fielding III
Joe E. Brown as Osgood Fielding III
a funny middle-aged millionaire, the much-married aging mama's-boy
Joan Shawlee as Sweet Sue
Joan Shawlee as Sweet Sue
the bandleader of "Sweet Sue and Her Society Syncopators" with two things she can't put up during working hours: liquor and men.
Dave Barry as Mister Bienstock
Dave Barry as Mister Bienstock
the band manager and not the night watchman of girls band.
Billy Gray as Sig Poliakoff
Billy Gray as Sig Poliakoff
"Bands for all occasions", Joe and Jerry's agent in Chicago.
Barbara Drew as Nellie Weinmeyer
Barbara Drew as Nellie Weinmeyer
Poliakoff's secretary, naive and vengeful, in search of some love.
George Raft as Spats Colombo
George Raft as Spats Colombo
a mobster from Chicago, South Side Chapter, ruthless in removing his foundries and greedy for power.
Pat O'Brien as Federal agent Mulligan
Pat O'Brien as Federal agent Mulligan
in confrontation with alcohol traffickers during Prohibition-era, made a police raid on "Mozzarella's Funeral Parlor".
George E. Stone as Toothpick Charlie
George E. Stone as Toothpick Charlie
a gangster from Chicago, North Side Chapter, victim of Saint Valentine's Day Massacre.
Nehemiah Persoff as Little Bonaparte
Nehemiah Persoff as Little Bonaparte
a mobster who organizes the convention of Mob delegates "Friends Of Italian Opera".

Story


Chicago, February, 1929. Saxophonist Joe and bass player Jerry eagerly discuss plans for their salary from their first job in four months. Putting up their coats as collateral, they place a bet with their bookie, and promptly lose both the bet and their coats. Desperate, Joe and Jerry visit Sid Poliakoff's agency building hoping to line up another job. Sid tells them of a job at a college dance in Urbana and Joe accepts, then charms Nellie into loaning them her car for the Urbana gig. Retrieving the car at a garage owned by Toothpick Charlie, Joe and Jerry unintentionally witness Spats hit. Joe then telephones Sid and accepts the job with the all-girl band. That evening at the train station, Joe and Jerry, uncomfortably disguised as women, check in with band leader Sweet Sue and manager Beinstock as the newest members of the Society Syncopators, Joe as Josephine and Jerry as Daphne. Once on board the train, Joe fears that Jerry's enthusiasm at finding himself among so many women will expose them and warns his friend to behave "like a girl," but in the process, musses Jerry's outfit. Later during rehearsal, after Sugar perform Runnin' Wild, when she's flask falls to the floor, Jerry steps forward, and claims the flask is his own. Upon arriving in Florida at the beachfront Ritz Seminole Hotel, "Daphne" catches the attention of wealthy, oft-married Osgood Fielding III. Jerry reluctantly agrees and then accompanies Sugar to the beach. Unknown to Jerry, Joe has stolen Beinstock's suitcase of clothes and eyeglasses and, dressing in them, goes to the beach where he stages an accidental meeting with Sugar. Joe implies that he is the heir to the Shell Oil company and, captivated by the apparently sensitive "Junior," Sugar invites him to the band's opening that night. Back in their room, Jerry receives a call from Osgood inviting Daphne to a candlelit dinner on board his yacht. Joe accepts for Jerry, then tells his protesting friend that he must keep the date with Osgood on shore, as he, in the guise of Shell Oil, Junior, plans to dine with Sugar on Osgood's yacht. In the performance of that nightperformance of that night, when Sugar sang I Wanna Be Loved By You, Osgood sends Jerry an enormous bouquet, which Joe commandeers to give to Sugar with a card inviting her to dine with Junior. Afterward, Joe meets Sugar on the pier as an unhappy Jerry talks Osgood into dining at a local roadhouse. While Jerry and Osgood tango to the music of a Cuban band at the roadhouse, on board Osgood's yacht Joe meets Sugar (watch Some Like It Hot Trailer). When they thought they were free from the threat, the gangsters meet at the hotel under the guise of attending an opera convention. Mulligan is also present. Upon spotting Spats in the lobby, Joe and Jerry panic and realize they must flee. In their room, Jerry laments having to give up Osgood and Joe telephones Sugar to disclose that Junior's family has ordered him to Venezuela immediately for an arranged marriage. Joe and Jerry then escape out of their hotel window but are seen by Spats and his men on the floor below. When the pair dash away leaving their instruments behind, Spats finds bullet holes in Jerry's bass and realizes the "broads" are the Chicago witnesses in disguise. Knowing they have been discovered, Joe and Jerry dress as a bellboy and a wheelchair-bound millionaire and head across the lobby filled with Spats's men. Noticing that Jerry has inadvertently left on his high heels, the henchmen give chase and Joe and Jerry run into a convention hall and hide, unaware that the mob "convention" is scheduled to meet there. Moments later, Spats sits at the table under which Joe and Jerry are hiding, and in a prearranged plan, Bonaparte pretends to honor Spats by presenting him with a giant cake. Joe and Jerry bolt, but as Bonaparte orders them found, Mulligan and his men close in to make arrests. Resuming their disguises as women, Joe and Jerry overhear that the remainder of Bonaparte's men are watching all buses and trains out of town and Joe decides they should escape on Osgood's yacht after Jerry elopes with him. While Jerry telephones Osgood to make arrangements, Joe hears Sugar and the band finishing song and climbs onto the stage to tell her that no man is worth her heartbreak, then kisses her before hurrying away. Realizing that "Josephine" is "Junior," Sugar follows the men down to the dock and the waiting Osgood.

Quotes from movie


SHELL OIL JUNIOR: I'm terribly sorry. You're not hurt, are you? SUGAR: I don't think so. JUNIOR: I wish you'd make sure. Because when people find out who I am, they hire a shyster lawyer and sue me for three quarters of a million dollars. SUGAR: I won't sue you, no matter who you are. JUNIOR: Thank you. SUGAR: Who are you? JUNIOR: Now, really! DAPHNE: Sugar! Come on. Honestly. JUNIOR: Cheerio. SUGAR: Haven't I seen you somewhere before? JUNIOR: Not very likely. SUGAR: Are you staying at the hotel? JUNIOR: Not at all. SUGAR: Your face is familiar. JUNIOR: You may have seen it in newspapers or magazines. Vanity Fair. SUGAR: That must be it. JUNIOR: Would you mind moving a little? You're blocking my view. SUGAR: Of what? JUNIOR: They run up a red-and-white flag on the yacht when it's time for cocktails. SUGAR: You own a yacht? Which one is it? The big one? JUNIOR: Certainly not. With all the world unrest, nobody should have a yacht that sleeps more than 12. SUGAR: I quite agree. Tell me, who runs up that flag? Your wife? JUNIOR: No, my flag steward. SUGAR: Who mixes the cocktails? Your wife? JUNIOR: No, my cocktail steward. Look, if you're interested in whether I am married or not... SUGAR: Oh, I'm not interested at all. JUNIOR: Well, I'm not.

Production


Directed and Produced by Billy Wilder Screenplay by Billy Wilder, I. A. L. Diamond Story by Robert Thoeren, Michael Logan Music by Adolph Deutsch Cinematography Charles Lang Edited by Arthur P. Schmidt Production company: Mirisch Company Release date March, 1959

Notes

Billy Wilder wrote the script for the film with writer I.A.L. Diamond. The plot was based on a screenplay by Robert Thoeren and Michael Logan for the 1935 French film Fanfare of Love.

In 1998, the American Film Institute ranked this as the #14 Greatest American films of all time.

The film was made in California during the summer and autumn of 1958. Many scenes were shot at the Hotel del Coronado in Coronado, California which appeared as the "Seminole Ritz Hotel" in Miami in the film, as it fit into the era of the 1920s and was near Hollywood.

The film's closing line "Well, nobody's perfect." was voted as the #48 greatest movie quote by the American Film Institute.

Curtis has said that he asked Wilder if he could imitate Cary Grant for his stint as the millionaire in the movie. Wilder liked it and they shot it that way. Apparently, Grant saw the parody of himself and stated, jokingly, "I don't talk like that."

Monroe originally didn't want to play Sugar. She said "I don't want to play someone who can't tell Daphne and Josephine are really men dressed in drag."

Lemmon got along with Marilyn Monroe and forgave her eccentricities. He believed Marilyn simply couldn't go in front of the camera until she was absolutely ready.